College Core Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

ARDE-Art and Design

ARDE1190. Introduction to the Visual Arts (3)
This introductory course is designed specifically for the non-art major. Its purpose is to provide insight and understanding of art's unique technical and aesthetic contributions within the overall cultural framework.  

BIBL-Biblical Studies

BIBL1120. Survey of the Bible (3)
An introductory survey of the Old and New Testaments. This course will focus on the literature of the Bible and the history of the biblical period.

BIBL3130. New Testament Studies (3)
An in-depth study of selected books, genres or forms in the New Testament.  The course will include a spiritual formation emphasis.  The specific focus of the class will be determined by the instructor and announced as the course subtitle.  Prerequisites:BIBL1120

BIOL-Biology

BIOL1040. Environmental Science (3)
A study of the issues pertaining to environmental sustainability including topics such as population growth, energy, pollution, and conserving biodiversity. A central theme is Christian Stewardship.  

BIOL1060. Human Biology (3)
Selected topics related to the human body with particular emphasis on the integration of form and function as well as genetics and ethics. This course does not apply toward major requirements in biology. 

BIOL1060L. Human Biology Laboratory (1)
A laboratory study, using selected topics relating to the human body, which is intended to be taught in connection with BIOL1060. This course does not apply toward major requirements in biology. Corequisite: BIOL1060

BIOL3340. Birds of Prey (3)
This course acquaints the student with the uniqueness and diversity of Idaho's birds of prey. Through lecture, laboratory sessions and field trips, the course explores the distinguishing features for identification, distribution, natural history, and habitat requirements of most North American birds of prey. This course can be used as general education laboratory credit.

CHEM-Chemistry

CHEM1060. Chemistry for Citizens (3)
An examination of the role of chemistry in today's society: historical aspects, technological advances, industrial applications, environment and ecological applications. No prior knowledge of chemistry is assumed. Corequisites: CHEM1060L  

CHEM1060L. Chemistry for Citizens Laboratory (1)
An application and exploration of the principles and techniques described in CHEM1060. Corequisites: CHEM1060 

CLST-Cultural Studies

CLST1001L. Intercultural Lab - Tier 1 (0)
This lab is a co-requirement with Tier 1 travel experiences for the General Education Cross Cultural Experience. In order to fulfill general-education requirements for an approved Tier 1 travel experience, students must enroll in the intercultural lab. In the lab, students will complete the cross-cultural seminar and various self-reflection exercises related to their cross-cultural experience.

CLST1002L. Intercultural Lab - Tier 2 (0)
This lab is a co-requirement with Tier 2 cross-cultural courses/experiences for the General Education Cross Cultural Experience. In order to fulfill general-education requirements for an approved Tier 2 course or experience, students must enroll in the intercultural lab. In the lab, students will complete the cross-cultural seminar and various self-reflection exercises related to their cross-cultural experience.

CLST1003L. Intercultural Lab - Tier 3 (0)
This lab is a co-requirement with Tier 3 cross-cultural courses and stand-alone experiences for the General Education Cross Cultural Experience. In order to fulfill general-education requirements for an approved Tier 3 course or stand-alone experience, students must enroll in the intercultural lab. In the lab, students will complete the cross-cultural seminar and various self-reflection exercises related to their cross-cultural experience.

COMM-Communication Studies

COMM1210. Introduction to Public Speaking (3)
An introduction to verbal communication in groups, listening, and public speaking. Emphasis will be placed on speaking with delivery issues, speech construction, audience connection, and the communication process. 

ENGL-English

ENGL0900. Improvement of Language Usage (3)
A course for students who are not prepared for college-level composition, emphasizing a systematic study of language usage, spelling and writing. (Does not satisfy the catalog specific course requirement for English Composition.) 

ENGL1020. English Composition (3)
A course intended to develop in students college-level writing skills and stimulate them to think critically, express themselves clearly, and develop an appreciation for the medium of language through a variety of writing experiences. For the course to count for General Education requirements, a student must earn a grade of C- or better. Prerequisites: ACT English score of 18 or higher, or an SAT English score of 460, or a COMPASS English score of 70, or a passing grade in ENGL0900.

ENGL2020. Research Writing and Critical Thinking (3)
A course which enables students to sharpen analytical reading skills and, through the medium of research projects, to continue to refine the critical thinking and writing skills developed in English Composition. It acquaints students with current information technology and library resources available at NNU, and covers the entire process of researching and writing position papers. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL1020 with a grade of C- or better or advanced placement. 

ENGL3240. Studies in American Literature (3)
A study of selected works by American authors which may focus on an individual author, a topic, or a time period.  May be repeated for credit. 

ENGL3340. Studies in British Literature (3)
A study of selected works by British authors which may focus on an individual author, a topic, or a time period.  May be repeated for credit. 

ENGL3440. Studies in World Literature (3)
A study of selected works by non-American or non-British authors which may focus on an individual author, a topic, or a time period. May be repeated for credit. 

ENGL3740. Children's Literature (3)
A study of literature written for children, from pre-school age onward. The course samples a variety of types of literature and will prove valuable for general students, prospective teachers, or parents who wish to enrich their own background in children's literature and to develop qualitative judgment skills.

GEOG-Geography

GEOG1050. Introduction to Geography (3)
An introduction to the basic concepts, principles and themes in the discipline of geography. The course also includes an investigation into the unique characteristics of the world's twelve major geographic realms. Special emphasis will be placed on the influence of geography on social, political, environmental, and economic aspects of human development. 

HIST-History

HIST1030. The World and the West I (3)
This course begins with the classical eras, both east and west (ca. 600 BC) and ends in about 1600. Its goal is two fold: to understand both the primary cultural heritages of the world and their growing interconnectedness, and to put the energy and distinctiveness of the Western tradition into perspective with other political worlds and religious world-views. 

HIST1040. The World and the West II (3)
This course begins in 1600 and proceeds to the present, trying to understand and assess the parallel and increasing interactive developments in the West and other parts of the world. Colonial enterprises of many types interact with indigenous cultures and systems in what we now call "third world" areas. Nation-building, with competitive empires, affects Europe, Africa and Asia. Very different independence struggles punctuate 19th and 20th century history. 

HIST2030. Conflict and Consensus: American History to 1877 (3)
An introduction to American history from the period of exploration and colonization to the conclusion of reconstruction. Major themes and events include the European settlement of North America, Native American responses to European development of colonial America, the war for American independence, nation-building in the Early Republic, the development of slavery, Western expansion, and the Civil War and reconstruction.

HIST2040. Conflict and Consensus: American History from 1877 (3)
An introduction to American history from the conclusion of reconstruction to recent times. Major themes include Western expansion, industrialization and urbanization, imperialism, two world wars, American life between the wars, radicalism and revolt, and the post-Cold War world. 

HIST3480. Modern Europe (1800-Present) (3)
An in-depth exploration of Europe from the political and industrial revolutions of the 18th and 19th centuries through contemporary European society and culture, including 19th century "isms" (romanticism, liberalism, socialism, nationalism, imperialism) and world wars. 

HUMN-Humanities

HUMN1010. Cornerstone (3)

This course is intended to help students develop a life-long passion for learning. They will explore the habits of mind of various academic disciplines and discover differing perspectives on the pursuit of knowledge as well as their commonalities and connectedness. Students will be introduced to the four University outcomes, develop skills necessary for a successful college experience, and begin collecting a portfolio to document their learning and track their personal, spiritual, and academic growth throughout their college career.

HUMN4010. Capstone (1)

This course is intended to help students reflect on their undergraduate experience and plan for the future. Students will reflect on what they have learned by reviewing portfolio materials they have collected, habits of mind they have acquired through study of the disciplines, and the development of their ideas about the four University outcomes. Using the education they have acquired, they will begin planning ways to provide effective service and leadership in their families, churches, community, and work.

KINE-Kinesiology

KINE1000. Fundamentals of Wellness (1)
An approach to health and physical education relating the value of physical activity to the human body. The content of the course will be presented by utilizing lecture and laboratory sessions. The course emphasizes the "holistic" wellness approach to the individual regarding the dimensions of wellness.

KINE1020. Heart Healthy Activities (1)
Wellness activities of adult fitness, aerobic fitness, cycling, life guarding, physical fitness, yoga, pilates, martial arts, skiing and derivatives offered, swimming (intermediate), jogging/walking, and water fitness. Two activities per semester. This course fulfills one general education KINE activity requirement. May be repeated for elective credit but not for general education credit.

MATH-Mathematics

MATH0900. Essential Mathematics (3)
Whole numbers, fractions and mixed numbers, decimals, ratio, proportion, percent, measurement, geometry, introduction of algebra, solving equations, and statistics. This is a credit/no credit course. Receiving credit for this course prepares the student to take MATH1100. Credit for courses numbered below 1000 is not transferable. 

MATH1100. Liberal Arts Mathematics (3)
Students will explore mathematical ideas and logical reasoning. This class will look at mathematical applications in life which may include topics such as statistics, fair voting schemes, prime numbers, and modular arithmetic. Students will also develop their own insights and theorems through the exploration of mathematical patterns. The content of the class may vary each semester. The course is designed for non-science majors. The course satisfies the general education mathematics competency requirement. Prerequisites: ACT score of 21 or equivalency on the COMPASS Exam.

MUSC-Music

MUSC1010. A Survey of Art and Music (3)
An introduction to the stylistic characteristics and cultural climate of the important artistic epochs in history, and includes both the western and the non-western traditions.

PELA - Prior Experiential Learning Assessment 

PELA1000. Prior Experiential Learning Assessment (3)
This course is an introduction to prior learning assessment.  It examines adult life experiences as a foundation for experiential learning.  By reflecting on the concepts of adult development theories and an individual's personal life experiences, the course will explore how those factors influence  and help individuals to interpret life situations and circumstances in terms of job skills, and college level learning.  Attention will be given to the development of a prior learning portfolio and assessment of prior learning, enabling students to earn college-level credit for college level life learning. 

PHIL-Philosophy 

PHIL3120. Philosophical Concepts (3)
An introduction to basic philosophical concepts.  Special attention will be given to understanding and critical response. 

PSYC-Psychology

PSYC1550. Introduction to Psychology (3)
A study of the basic principles of human behavior, giving attention to developmental patterns, motivation and adjustment, learning and memory processes, and individual differences in aptitude, personality, and mental health. 

SOGY-Sociology

SOGY1010. Exploring Cultural Anthropology (3)
This course is designed to provide both a conceptual framework for and personal experience in identifying cultural differences and valuing/validating those differences in everyday life of adult students.   Fulfills a General Education Tier III Cross-Cultural Experience if taken with CLST1003L Intercultural Lab. 

THEO-Theology

THEO2120. Introduction to Christian Theology (3)
A study of the foundational doctrines of the Christian faith from a biblical perspective with special emphasis given to the Wesleyan-Arminian tradition.